Tag: Workforce

On March 2, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive order fully reopening the state’s businesses and facilities, becoming one of the first states in the US to do so. More than six months later, however, Texas is still lagging behind the rest of the country in the post-pandemic recovery. What’s going on?

Patrick Jankowski, senior vice president of research at the Greater Houston Partnership, a chamber of commerce serving the Houston region, explains:

“The service side of Houston’s economy—professional services, finance, health care, recreation, retail, restaurants, bars—are approaching full recovery. However, the goods producing sectors—energy, manufacturing, construction—continue to struggle. Their woes pre-date the pandemic.

“Houston has suffered from an overbuilt office market since the mid-00s. The capital markets have been closed to the energy sector since 2018, making it more difficult to drill wells. And manufacturing in Houston is closely tied to energy and followed the same path.”

Houston is evidently the 2nd fastest growing technology hub in the United States: 

Citing data from career platform LinkedIn, Houston has seen a healthy influx of tech workers since the start of the pandemic. In fact, Houston ranks second among 14 major U.S. labor markets for the number of relocating software and IT workers between March 2020 and February 2021 compared with the same period a year earlier.

Despite all the unknowns, creativity, innovation and STEM skills are bound to be critical for Gen Alpha, says the Norwegian Minister of Education and Integration Guri Melby.

Generation X-ers and even Millennials had it easy when it came to imagining what they would do in the future. But Generation Alpha, a cohort born in the early 2010s through the mid-2020s, won’t have the same luxury of predictability. Today we face change so rapid that the future jobs for this generation are nearly impossible to foresee.

Norwegian Minister of Education Guri Melby gives Ignite News her take on how to educate and prepare this generation for the future.

Despite all the unknowns, creativity, innovation and STEM skills are bound to be critical for Gen Alpha, says Norwegian Minister of Education Guri Melby.
The phenomenon of robotization is more accurately characterized by a shift in the type of jobs available: it creates an opportunity for us to let robots do the more routine, mundane or even dangerous jobs, while we can focus on creating value and insights.

What’s the robotic reality for my line of work? 

A 2019 report by McKinsey Global Institute that studied 46 countries and more than 800 types of jobs came to the staggering conclusion that 800 million workers are at risk of losing their jobs to automation by 2030. The report also estimated that 375 million workers likely will have to switch occupational categories by 2030 in order to avoid unemployment. 

The phenomenon of robotization is more accurately characterized by a shift in the type of jobs available: it creates an opportunity for us to let robots do the more routine, mundane or even dangerous jobs, while we can focus on creating value and insights.

The word “DataOps” isn’t a common sight in job titles — yet. But as our survey of leaders at oil and gas supermajors and CXOs in manufacturing, construction, and power showed, data savvy is one of the skills that will be in high demand in the coming years.

One of the few people with “DataOps” in their job title is Simon Trewin, who works for the financial services technology consulting firm Kinaesis. Trewin (who styles himself as a DataOps transformation expert) last week spoke with DevOps Online about why DataOps “is now of essential value to businesses.”

Farmers around the world are facing another summer upended by the coronavirus pandemic, reigniting calls for large-scale automation of the agriculture industry.

One such initiative: the Global Harvest Automation Initiative, announced earlier this year by farming association Western Growers. In short, the initiative aims to create a standardized technology stack and help automation startups get their robots into the field faster.

“It’s time to declare our moonshot: to automate 50% of this industry.”

 

We’ve surveyed about a dozen executives in various industries about the roles they will need in the next 5-10 years.

Top leaders at oil and gas supermajors and CXOs in manufacturing, construction, and power all agreed that these are the types of jobs that are being discussed behind closed doors, based on insights and careful observation of industry development. Here’s a look at some of the job titles that 2025-2030 may have to offer.